Celebrating Holy Week in the Diocese of Saginaw

April 01, 2016  •  Leave a Comment

As a freelance documentary photographer, one of my clients is the Catholic Diocese of Saginaw, and as a lifelong Catholic, it is a special honor to be able to document and share my faith. Since each liturgy includes unique visual elements, it is exciting to photograph; they include everything from palms to oils, small candles in the dark to a larger fire outdoors and all sorts of processions. Each of these make the different Masses visually interesting, and sometimes challenging.

Holy Week begins on Palm Sunday, during which Christians commemorate Jesus' triumphant entry into Jerusalem as the Jews waved palm branches and sang "Hosanna!" as praise. Christians recall this by processing with palms. This year, the Most Rev. Joseph Cistone, Bishop of Saginaw, celebrated a Feed the Fire Youth Mass at Blessed Sacrament Parish in Midland.

 

Feed the Fire Mass at Blessed Sacrament, MidlandFeed the Fire Mass at Blessed Sacrament, MidlandThe Most Rev. Joseph R. Cistone, Bishop of Saginaw, celebrated a "Feed the Fire" Mass for the Palm Sunday Vigil on Saturday, March 19, at Blessed Sacrament Parish in Midland.Bishop Cistone celebrates Feed the Fire Masses to bring together youth from around the diocese. These Masses are planned for youth and their families and include upbeat praise and worship music.
The next Feed the Fire Mass will be Saturday, April 23, at 4 p.m. at St. Dominic Parish, St. Stephen Church, 1310 Malzahn St. in Saginaw. All are invited to attend this Mass, and there is no registration needed for this free event. Following Mass, those in attendance have an opportunity to share dinner with Bishop Cistone, and there is additional time for prayer.
Feed the Fire Mass at Blessed Sacrament, MidlandFeed the Fire Mass at Blessed Sacrament, MidlandThe Most Rev. Joseph R. Cistone, Bishop of Saginaw, celebrated a "Feed the Fire" Mass for the Palm Sunday Vigil on Saturday, March 19, at Blessed Sacrament Parish in Midland.Bishop Cistone celebrates Feed the Fire Masses to bring together youth from around the diocese. These Masses are planned for youth and their families and include upbeat praise and worship music.
The next Feed the Fire Mass will be Saturday, April 23, at 4 p.m. at St. Dominic Parish, St. Stephen Church, 1310 Malzahn St. in Saginaw. All are invited to attend this Mass, and there is no registration needed for this free event. Following Mass, those in attendance have an opportunity to share dinner with Bishop Cistone, and there is additional time for prayer.
Feed the Fire Mass at Blessed Sacrament, MidlandFeed the Fire Mass at Blessed Sacrament, MidlandThe Most Rev. Joseph R. Cistone, Bishop of Saginaw, celebrated a "Feed the Fire" Mass for the Palm Sunday Vigil on Saturday, March 19, at Blessed Sacrament Parish in Midland.Bishop Cistone celebrates Feed the Fire Masses to bring together youth from around the diocese. These Masses are planned for youth and their families and include upbeat praise and worship music.
The next Feed the Fire Mass will be Saturday, April 23, at 4 p.m. at St. Dominic Parish, St. Stephen Church, 1310 Malzahn St. in Saginaw. All are invited to attend this Mass, and there is no registration needed for this free event. Following Mass, those in attendance have an opportunity to share dinner with Bishop Cistone, and there is additional time for prayer.
On Tuesday, I covered the Chrism Mass, during which the oils to be used for different sacraments are blessed by the bishop. The Cathedral of Mary of the Assumption was packed with almost 700 people from all 56 parishes across the diocese. 

 

SAGINAW— The Most Rev. Joseph R. Cistone, Bishop of Saginaw, celebrated the Chrism Mass on Tuesday, March 22 at the Cathedral of Mary of the Assumption in Saginaw. Bishop Cistone was joined by priests, deacons, religious sisters and parishioners from across the 11-county diocese, representing each of the 56 parishes.

At the Chrism Mass, the holy oils— which will be used for the sacraments of Baptism, Confirmation, Holy Orders and Anointing of the Sick, as well as the dedication of churches and consecration of altars— were blessed by Bishop Cistone and distributed to representatives of the parish communities within the Diocese of Saginaw. The priests of the diocese concelebrated the Mass with Bishop Cistone and made a renewal of their priestly vows.

For the first time in the diocese's history, the Chrism Mass was aired live on WNEM TV-5, wnem.com and saginaw.org.

“As a Church, we are continuing to look for ways to reach out and share the Good News of Jesus Christ, not only with our Catholic population, but also with the community at large,” said Bishop Cistone. “Sharing our Chrism Mass is one way in which we can invite people to experience the loving and merciful heart of Jesus.”

Bishop Cistone used this opportunity to teach about the Mass, which was being viewed by Catholic school students and many others. He explained the historical and Biblical significance of holy oils, as well as the different parts of the Mass.

A replay of the Chrism Mass will be available on WNEM TV-5 on Saturday, March 26, following the 11 p.m. news and on ENEM MY5 on Friday, March 25 at 3 p.m.
SAGINAW— The Most Rev. Joseph R. Cistone, Bishop of Saginaw, celebrated the Chrism Mass on Tuesday, March 22 at the Cathedral of Mary of the Assumption in Saginaw. Bishop Cistone was joined by priests, deacons, religious sisters and parishioners from across the 11-county diocese, representing each of the 56 parishes.

At the Chrism Mass, the holy oils— which will be used for the sacraments of Baptism, Confirmation, Holy Orders and Anointing of the Sick, as well as the dedication of churches and consecration of altars— were blessed by Bishop Cistone and distributed to representatives of the parish communities within the Diocese of Saginaw. The priests of the diocese concelebrated the Mass with Bishop Cistone and made a renewal of their priestly vows.

For the first time in the diocese's history, the Chrism Mass was aired live on WNEM TV-5, wnem.com and saginaw.org.

“As a Church, we are continuing to look for ways to reach out and share the Good News of Jesus Christ, not only with our Catholic population, but also with the community at large,” said Bishop Cistone. “Sharing our Chrism Mass is one way in which we can invite people to experience the loving and merciful heart of Jesus.”

Bishop Cistone used this opportunity to teach about the Mass, which was being viewed by Catholic school students and many others. He explained the historical and Biblical significance of holy oils, as well as the different parts of the Mass.

A replay of the Chrism Mass will be available on WNEM TV-5 on Saturday, March 26, following the 11 p.m. news and on ENEM MY5 on Friday, March 25 at 3 p.m.
SAGINAW— The Most Rev. Joseph R. Cistone, Bishop of Saginaw, celebrated the Chrism Mass on Tuesday, March 22 at the Cathedral of Mary of the Assumption in Saginaw. Bishop Cistone was joined by priests, deacons, religious sisters and parishioners from across the 11-county diocese, representing each of the 56 parishes.

At the Chrism Mass, the holy oils— which will be used for the sacraments of Baptism, Confirmation, Holy Orders and Anointing of the Sick, as well as the dedication of churches and consecration of altars— were blessed by Bishop Cistone and distributed to representatives of the parish communities within the Diocese of Saginaw. The priests of the diocese concelebrated the Mass with Bishop Cistone and made a renewal of their priestly vows.

For the first time in the diocese's history, the Chrism Mass was aired live on WNEM TV-5, wnem.com and saginaw.org.

“As a Church, we are continuing to look for ways to reach out and share the Good News of Jesus Christ, not only with our Catholic population, but also with the community at large,” said Bishop Cistone. “Sharing our Chrism Mass is one way in which we can invite people to experience the loving and merciful heart of Jesus.”

Bishop Cistone used this opportunity to teach about the Mass, which was being viewed by Catholic school students and many others. He explained the historical and Biblical significance of holy oils, as well as the different parts of the Mass.

A replay of the Chrism Mass will be available on WNEM TV-5 on Saturday, March 26, following the 11 p.m. news and on ENEM MY5 on Friday, March 25 at 3 p.m.
SAGINAW— The Most Rev. Joseph R. Cistone, Bishop of Saginaw, celebrated the Chrism Mass on Tuesday, March 22 at the Cathedral of Mary of the Assumption in Saginaw. Bishop Cistone was joined by priests, deacons, religious sisters and parishioners from across the 11-county diocese, representing each of the 56 parishes.

At the Chrism Mass, the holy oils— which will be used for the sacraments of Baptism, Confirmation, Holy Orders and Anointing of the Sick, as well as the dedication of churches and consecration of altars— were blessed by Bishop Cistone and distributed to representatives of the parish communities within the Diocese of Saginaw. The priests of the diocese concelebrated the Mass with Bishop Cistone and made a renewal of their priestly vows.

For the first time in the diocese's history, the Chrism Mass was aired live on WNEM TV-5, wnem.com and saginaw.org.

“As a Church, we are continuing to look for ways to reach out and share the Good News of Jesus Christ, not only with our Catholic population, but also with the community at large,” said Bishop Cistone. “Sharing our Chrism Mass is one way in which we can invite people to experience the loving and merciful heart of Jesus.”

Bishop Cistone used this opportunity to teach about the Mass, which was being viewed by Catholic school students and many others. He explained the historical and Biblical significance of holy oils, as well as the different parts of the Mass.

A replay of the Chrism Mass will be available on WNEM TV-5 on Saturday, March 26, following the 11 p.m. news and on ENEM MY5 on Friday, March 25 at 3 p.m.
SAGINAW— The Most Rev. Joseph R. Cistone, Bishop of Saginaw, celebrated the Chrism Mass on Tuesday, March 22 at the Cathedral of Mary of the Assumption in Saginaw. Bishop Cistone was joined by priests, deacons, religious sisters and parishioners from across the 11-county diocese, representing each of the 56 parishes.

At the Chrism Mass, the holy oils— which will be used for the sacraments of Baptism, Confirmation, Holy Orders and Anointing of the Sick, as well as the dedication of churches and consecration of altars— were blessed by Bishop Cistone and distributed to representatives of the parish communities within the Diocese of Saginaw. The priests of the diocese concelebrated the Mass with Bishop Cistone and made a renewal of their priestly vows.

For the first time in the diocese's history, the Chrism Mass was aired live on WNEM TV-5, wnem.com and saginaw.org.

“As a Church, we are continuing to look for ways to reach out and share the Good News of Jesus Christ, not only with our Catholic population, but also with the community at large,” said Bishop Cistone. “Sharing our Chrism Mass is one way in which we can invite people to experience the loving and merciful heart of Jesus.”

Bishop Cistone used this opportunity to teach about the Mass, which was being viewed by Catholic school students and many others. He explained the historical and Biblical significance of holy oils, as well as the different parts of the Mass.

A replay of the Chrism Mass will be available on WNEM TV-5 on Saturday, March 26, following the 11 p.m. news and on ENEM MY5 on Friday, March 25 at 3 p.m.
SAGINAW— The Most Rev. Joseph R. Cistone, Bishop of Saginaw, celebrated the Chrism Mass on Tuesday, March 22 at the Cathedral of Mary of the Assumption in Saginaw. Bishop Cistone was joined by priests, deacons, religious sisters and parishioners from across the 11-county diocese, representing each of the 56 parishes.

At the Chrism Mass, the holy oils— which will be used for the sacraments of Baptism, Confirmation, Holy Orders and Anointing of the Sick, as well as the dedication of churches and consecration of altars— were blessed by Bishop Cistone and distributed to representatives of the parish communities within the Diocese of Saginaw. The priests of the diocese concelebrated the Mass with Bishop Cistone and made a renewal of their priestly vows.

For the first time in the diocese's history, the Chrism Mass was aired live on WNEM TV-5, wnem.com and saginaw.org.

“As a Church, we are continuing to look for ways to reach out and share the Good News of Jesus Christ, not only with our Catholic population, but also with the community at large,” said Bishop Cistone. “Sharing our Chrism Mass is one way in which we can invite people to experience the loving and merciful heart of Jesus.”

Bishop Cistone used this opportunity to teach about the Mass, which was being viewed by Catholic school students and many others. He explained the historical and Biblical significance of holy oils, as well as the different parts of the Mass.

A replay of the Chrism Mass will be available on WNEM TV-5 on Saturday, March 26, following the 11 p.m. news and on ENEM MY5 on Friday, March 25 at 3 p.m.
Thursday was the beginning of the Easter Triduum— three sacred days, Holy Thursday, Good Friday and Holy Saturday. Holy Thursday commemorates the Last Supper and includes the ritual washing of feet, recalling how Jesus washed the feet of His 12 disciples at the Last Supper.

At the end of Mass, the faithful process with the Blessed Sacrament to an altar of repose instead of the church's tabernacle. This recalls Jesus going to pray in the Garden of Gethsemane on the Mount of Olives before being arrested.

On Good Friday, the liturgy is very solemn as the faithful remember and mourn Jesus' death. The Passion narrative is read from the Gospel of John and parishioners have the opportunity to reverence the Cross.

SAGINAW— The Most Rev. Joseph R. Cistone, Bishop of Saginaw, was present at the Cathedral of Mary of the Assumption in Saginaw where the Rev. Andy Booms, cathedral rector, led the faithful in the solemn liturgy of the Lord's Passion on Good Friday, March 25. The crucifixion and death of Our Lord is remembered as the faithful gather to venerate the cross and hear the Gospel of John's account of Christ’s Passion. By adoring the Holy Cross, the faithful are reverencing the instrument by which Christ won our salvation.

During the veneration, the choir chanted the Reproaches: "My people, What have I done to you? How have I hurt you? Answer me! I led you out of Egypt; but you led your Savior to the Cross. For forty years I led you safely through the desert, I fed you with manna from heaven, and brought you to the land of plenty; But you led your Savior to the Cross. O, My people! What have I done to you that you should testify against me?"

Mass is not celebrated on Good Friday, but the faithful may receive the Eucharist in the species of bread that was consecrated during the Holy Thursday Mass. The church is instead stripped of all decoration, and the doors of the tabernacle are left open for this day of mourning as we remember Christ's death.
SAGINAW— The Most Rev. Joseph R. Cistone, Bishop of Saginaw, was present at the Cathedral of Mary of the Assumption in Saginaw where the Rev. Andy Booms, cathedral rector, led the faithful in the solemn liturgy of the Lord's Passion on Good Friday, March 25. The crucifixion and death of Our Lord is remembered as the faithful gather to venerate the cross and hear the Gospel of John's account of Christ’s Passion. By adoring the Holy Cross, the faithful are reverencing the instrument by which Christ won our salvation.

During the veneration, the choir chanted the Reproaches: "My people, What have I done to you? How have I hurt you? Answer me! I led you out of Egypt; but you led your Savior to the Cross. For forty years I led you safely through the desert, I fed you with manna from heaven, and brought you to the land of plenty; But you led your Savior to the Cross. O, My people! What have I done to you that you should testify against me?"

Mass is not celebrated on Good Friday, but the faithful may receive the Eucharist in the species of bread that was consecrated during the Holy Thursday Mass. The church is instead stripped of all decoration, and the doors of the tabernacle are left open for this day of mourning as we remember Christ's death.
The Easter Vigil is celebrated on Holy Saturday at sundown. It begins with the blessing of the Easter Fire, which is used to light the Paschal Candle that symbolizes the Light of Christ. The candle is used to light the faithful's candles as the process into the cathedral. As Scripture readings tell the story of salvation from the creation of the world through the Gospel account of the Resurrection, the lights are gradually turned on.

SAGINAW— The Most Rev. Joseph R. Cistone, Bishop of Saginaw, celebrated the Easter Vigil Mass on Saturday, March 26, with the Rev. Andrew Booms at the Cathedral of Mary of the Assumption in Saginaw.

The Easter Vigil is a joyful night-watch by Christians who have gathered to celebrate the most important feast in the life of the Church – the Resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead.

The Vigil Mass begins outdoors with the blessing of the Easter fire. It is during the Vigil that more than 200 people across the diocese and thousands more around the world will join the Catholic Church as they receive the sacraments of baptism, confirmation and first Eucharist.
SAGINAW— The Most Rev. Joseph R. Cistone, Bishop of Saginaw, celebrated the Easter Vigil Mass on Saturday, March 26, with the Rev. Andrew Booms at the Cathedral of Mary of the Assumption in Saginaw.

The Easter Vigil is a joyful night-watch by Christians who have gathered to celebrate the most important feast in the life of the Church – the Resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead.

The Vigil Mass begins outdoors with the blessing of the Easter fire. It is during the Vigil that more than 200 people across the diocese and thousands more around the world will join the Catholic Church as they receive the sacraments of baptism, confirmation and first Eucharist.
SAGINAW— The Most Rev. Joseph R. Cistone, Bishop of Saginaw, celebrated the Easter Vigil Mass on Saturday, March 26, with the Rev. Andrew Booms at the Cathedral of Mary of the Assumption in Saginaw.

The Easter Vigil is a joyful night-watch by Christians who have gathered to celebrate the most important feast in the life of the Church – the Resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead.

The Vigil Mass begins outdoors with the blessing of the Easter fire. It is during the Vigil that more than 200 people across the diocese and thousands more around the world will join the Catholic Church as they receive the sacraments of baptism, confirmation and first Eucharist.
SAGINAW— The Most Rev. Joseph R. Cistone, Bishop of Saginaw, celebrated the Easter Vigil Mass on Saturday, March 26, with the Rev. Andrew Booms at the Cathedral of Mary of the Assumption in Saginaw.

The Easter Vigil is a joyful night-watch by Christians who have gathered to celebrate the most important feast in the life of the Church – the Resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead.

The Vigil Mass begins outdoors with the blessing of the Easter fire. It is during the Vigil that more than 200 people across the diocese and thousands more around the world will join the Catholic Church as they receive the sacraments of baptism, confirmation and first Eucharist.
SAGINAW— The Most Rev. Joseph R. Cistone, Bishop of Saginaw, celebrated the Easter Vigil Mass on Saturday, March 26, with the Rev. Andrew Booms at the Cathedral of Mary of the Assumption in Saginaw.

The Easter Vigil is a joyful night-watch by Christians who have gathered to celebrate the most important feast in the life of the Church – the Resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead.

The Vigil Mass begins outdoors with the blessing of the Easter fire. It is during the Vigil that more than 200 people across the diocese and thousands more around the world will join the Catholic Church as they receive the sacraments of baptism, confirmation and first Eucharist.
SAGINAW— The Most Rev. Joseph R. Cistone, Bishop of Saginaw, celebrated the Easter Vigil Mass on Saturday, March 26, with the Rev. Andrew Booms at the Cathedral of Mary of the Assumption in Saginaw.

The Easter Vigil is a joyful night-watch by Christians who have gathered to celebrate the most important feast in the life of the Church – the Resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead.

The Vigil Mass begins outdoors with the blessing of the Easter fire. It is during the Vigil that more than 200 people across the diocese and thousands more around the world will join the Catholic Church as they receive the sacraments of baptism, confirmation and first Eucharist.
Finally, Easter Sunday:  the joyful celebration of Jesus' Resurrection! The Cathedral was packed and I must admit I enjoyed seeing all the sweet little ones. Bishop Cistone invited them all up to the front for a little while, but when it was time to return to their seats, one little girl wanted to stay.

Easter Sunday Mass at the Cathedral of Mary of the Assumption, March 28, 2016

Easter Sunday Mass, like the vigil the night before, includes blessings with incense and holy water.
Easter Sunday Mass at the Cathedral of Mary of the Assumption, March 28, 2016 Easter Sunday Mass at the Cathedral of Mary of the Assumption, March 28, 2016 Easter Sunday Mass at the Cathedral of Mary of the Assumption, March 28, 2016


Comments

No comments posted.
Loading...